Your Psychologist

Your Psychologist

Tannah Elise Chase, M.A., Ph.D.

TC Headshot

 

Biography:

Hi! I’m Dr. Tannah Chase. I am a native Texan, born and raised in Houston and now a convert to the Texas hill country life. I received my M.A. in clinical psychology at the University of Houston-Clear Lake and then went on to receive my Ph.D. in clinical psychology at the University of Houston. My primary areas of specialty are in anxiety, stress, obsessive-compulsive spectrum disorders, and trauma. I also have training and experience working with a wide array of psychological concerns, including depressive and other mood disorders, substance abuse, loss/grief, and geriatric psychology. I would be remiss if I did not mention my training/experience and passion for working with military Veterans, first responders, and people in the helping field (e.g., doctors, nurses, mental health professionals).
Throughout my 12 years of training and experience, I have worked in a variety of settings, including community outpatient clinics, such as the Trauma and Anxiety Clinic of Houston and the Anxiety Disorders Clinic at the University of Houston. For several years, I worked at the Michael E. DeBakey Veterans Affairs Medical Center, where I worked with Veterans at both outpatient and inpatient levels of care. Prior to that, I worked at The Women’s Home, a residential treatment center for homeless women, and Crisis Intervention of Houston, where I worked as a crisis telephone counselor dispatching emergency mental health care to individuals in need.

 

My motto is… “Let your values be stronger than your fear.”

 

Sometimes in life, it can feel as though anxiety and stress have taken the wheel. I am dedicated to supporting and empowering you to take the wheel and drive in the direction of your values and authentic self.

 

My mission is to…

 

Provide the highest quality of psychological care possible
Reduce shame and stigma around mental health
Enhance courageousness defined by your values
Increase self- and other- compassion in the world
Provide a safe, empowering, and therapeutic environment, in which transformational change can flourish

 

Professional Memberships:

American Psychological Association
Texas Psychological Association
Association for Psychological Science
Association for Contextual Behavioral Science
Texas Chapter of the Association for Contextual Behavioral Science
Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies
International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies
International OCD Foundation

Featured Research Publications:

(Tannah Chase, nee Tannah Little)
Bautista, C. L., Chase, T., & Teng, E. J. (2020, in press). A pilot study of transdiagnostic group cognitive behavior therapy for anxiety: An intensive weekend intervention. Journal of Psychiatric Practice.
Chase, T., Chasson, G., C. Elizebeth, H., Wetterneck, C. T., Smith, A. H., & Hart J. M. (2019). The mediating role of emotion regulation difficulties in the relationship between self-compassion and OCD severity in a non-referred sample. Journal of Cognitive Psychotherapy, 33 (2).
Chase, T., Teng, E.J., Schmidt, N.B., & Zvolensky, M.J. (2018). Emotion regulation difficulties in relation to anxiety, depression, and functional impairment among treatment-seeking smokers. The Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, 206(8), 614-620. doi: 10.1097/NMD.0000000000000866.
Short, M. B., Wetterneck, C. T., Bistricky, S. L., Shutter, T., & Chase, T. (2016). Clinicians’ beliefs, observations, and treatment effectiveness regarding clients’ sexual addiction and internet pornography use. Community Mental Health Journal, 1-2. doi: 10.1007/s10597-016-0034-2
Szafranski, D. D., Talkovsky, A. M., Little, T. E., Menefee, D. S., Wanner, J. L., Gros, D. F., & Norton, P. J. (2016). Predictors of Inpatient PTSD Treatment Noncompletion among OEF/OIF/OND Veterans. Military Behavioral Health, 4(3), 269-275. doi: 10.1080/21635781.2016.1153536
Chase, T., Wetterneck, C.T., Bartsch, R. A., Leonard, R.C, & Riemann, B.C. (2015). Investigating treatment outcomes across OCD symptom dimensions in a clinical sample of OCD patients. Cognitive Behaviour Therapy. 44, 365-376. doi: 10.1080/16506073.2015.1015162
Norton, P. J., & Chase, T. (2015). Is a gin and tonic more like gin or tonic? A comparison of comorbid and non-comorbid anxiety disorder diagnostic pairs. Psychiatry Research, 225, 179-186. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.psychres.2014.11.017
Norton, P. J., Little, T. E., & Wetterneck, C. T. (2014). Does experience matter? Trainee experience and outcomes during transdiagnostic cognitive-behavioral group therapy for anxiety.Cognitive Behaviour Therapy, 43(3), 230-238. doi: 10.1080/16506073.2014.919014
Wetterneck, C. T., Little, T. E., Rinehart, K., Cervantez, M. E., Hyde, E., & Williams, M. (2012). Latinos with obsessive-compulsive disorder: Mental healthcare utilization and inclusion in clinical trials. Journal of Obsessive-Compulsive and Related Disorders, 1, 85-97. doi: 10.1016/j.jocrd.2011.12.001
Kowai-Bell, N., Guadagno, R. E., Little, T., & Ballew, J. L. (2012). Professors are people too: The impact of informal evaluations of professors on students and professors. Social Psychology of Education: An International Journal, 15(3), 337-351.
Wetterneck, C. T., Little, T. E., Chasson, G. S., Smith, A. H., Hart, J. M., Stanley, M. A., & Björgvinsson, T. (2011). Obsessive-compulsive personality traits: How are they related to OCD severity? The Journal of Anxiety Disorders, 25(8), 1024-1031. doi: 10.1016/j.janxdis.2011.06.011
Kowai-Bell, N., Guadagno, R. E., Little, T., Preiss, N., & Hensley, R. (2011). Rate my expectations: How online evaluations of professors impact students’ perceived control. Computers in Human Behavior, 27, 1862-1867. doi: 10.1016/j.chb.2011.04.009

 

T & Athena 11-18

The Anxiety Counseling Clinic, P.L.L.C.

1902 Common St., Ste. 300B, New Braunfels, TX 78130

Phone: 830-500-5442

Email: Dr.Chase.T@gmail.com

If you are having a mental health emergency, please call 911 or visit your nearest emergency room.

Copyright © 2019, Tannah Chase, Ph.D., All Rights Reserved.